tree: 1fd8d24dcdebf0ce15fedbd93c3af29d031c7937 [path history] [tgz]
  1. data/
  2. getdisplaymedia/
  3. mediarecorder/
  4. peerconnection/
  5. doc.go
  6. get_display_media.go
  7. media_recorder.go
  8. media_recorder_api.go
  9. media_recorder_multi.go
  10. media_recorder_perf.go
  11. README.md
  12. rtc_peer_connection.go
  13. rtc_peer_connection_perf.go
src/chromiumos/tast/local/bundles/cros/webrtc/README.md

WebRTC Tests Overview (tinyurl.com/cros-gfx-webrtc)

The Tast WebRTC tests are used to exercise and verify various WebRTC-related APIs. WebRTC in the current scope refers to the W3C Specifications (Specs) published under the Web Real-Time Communications Working Group, for use by a Web Application and provided by a User Agent (in this case Chrome). C++, Java or other built-in APIs can be derived from these ECMAScript-based Specs, and are beyond the scope of this document and test cases. Some popular Specifications under the WebRTC umbrella are:

  • WebRTC 1.0: Real-time Communication Between Browsers, defining APIs for media to be sent and received between possibly remote browsers. This includes the RTCPeerConnection interface, which supports peer-to-peer communications.

  • Media Capture and Streams, defining APIs for accessing capture devices such as webcams and microphones via the popular getUserMedia() interface. This Spec also defines the concepts of MediaStream and MediaStreamTrack that are used as opaque connectors for all WebRTC APIs.

    • The companion Screen Capture Spec defines the API for capturing content such as the screen, a window or an application using the getDisplayMedia() API.
  • MediaStream Recording, defining APIs for real-time encoding of media data flowing along a MediaStream. See the Chromium README.md for some important implementation notes.

The tests in this Tast webrtc folder are based on the mentioned API names. To get a list of all available WebRTC tests run:

tast list $HOST | grep webrtc.

WebRTC for video calls

WebRTC defines many components to build real-time applications that can be purely local (e.g. a microphone or screen recorder) or remote (e.g. a video call service or a live streaming application). Indeed, WebRTC provides support for popular video/audio call services such as Google Meet, Slack, Microsoft Teams and Zoom.

A popular WebRTC use case is multi-party video calls; these can be implemented as multiple concurrent peer-to-peer connections, but as the number of participants grows it‘s inefficient to have multiple such individual streams because of the associated amount of encoder and decoder instances. It’s common then to use a central server, either a Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU) or a Multipoint Control Unit (MCU), depending respectively on whether it forwards streams of data untouched or modifies them, usually decoding and reencoding them. SFUs are very popular due to their lower computational complexity. SFU clients are usually configured to send several encoded versions of the same video feed with varying resolution, frame rate and encoding quality. Each of these sub streams is called a layer and can be selected and forwarded more or less independently by the SFU. For example, a given client might be sending at a given time the same video feed encoded as 640x360 and 320x180 pixels, enabling the SFU to decide which one to forward to remote peers. The mandatory codecs in WebRTC, VP8 and H.264 (see RFC7742), use simulcast for layering, whereas later codecs such as VP9 and AV1 use Scalable Video Coding (SVC). For more information see here and here. Sophisticated video conferencing services such as Google Meet/Hangouts make extensive use of layering.

WebRTC in Chrome

Chrome‘s WebRTC implementation resides in //third_party/webrtc which is a mirror of https://webrtc.googlesource.com/src. A large part of the functionality runs in Chrome’s Renderer process, and concretely inside the Blink rendering engine, with hooks to delegate certain functionality such as video/audio capture/encoding/decoding or network I/O to other parts of Chrome (see WebRTC architecture). Of particular interest for ChromeOS is the offloading of video encoding and decoding to hardware accelerators, when those are available; the verification of this functionality is a primary concern of the tests in this folder.

WebRTC-in-Chrome supports a series of codecs or codec profiles, e.g. for video it supports VP9 and the mandatory VP8 and H.264. The actual codec to be used is decided during the establishment of a remote peer connection in an implementation-dependent process beyond the scope of this text, but it's reasonable to assume that hardware accelerated codecs are given priority. Note that WebRTC-in-Chrome must nearly always have a software encoder/decoder fallback per accelerator.

RTC PeerConnection tests (webrtc.RTCPeerConnection)

The RTC PeerConnection test verifies whether peer connections work correctly by establishing a loopback call, i.e. a call between two tabs in the same machine. This test has multiple variants, specified by the test case name parts. Every test case has a codec part, e.g. h264 or vp9 followed by none, one or several identifiers (e.g. enc).

  • Cases without any identifier besides the codec name verify whether RTCPeerConnection works by any means possible: fallback on a software video decoder/encoder is allowed if hardware video decoding/encoding fails. These are basically the vanilla variants/cases.

  • Tests with an enc identifier verify that hardware video encoding was used when expected, as per the SoC capabilities (see Video Capabilities), with a fallback on a software video encoder being treated as an error. Conversely, the tests with a dec identifier force and verify the usage of a hardware video decoder.

  • Tests with a simulcast identifier establish the loopback connection specifying use of VP8 simulcast with several layers (see the WebRTC for video calls Section); the enc_simulcast identifier indicates that the use of a hardware video encoder is forced and verified.

  • Tests with the cam identifier utilize the internal DUT camera if this is available, verifying that the format produced by it is compatible with the hardware video encoding stack. Tests without this identifier use the fake video capture device.

To run these tests use:

tast run $HOST webrtc.RTCPeerConnection.*

RTC PeerConnection Perf tests (webrtc.RTCPeerConnectionPerf)

The RTC PeerConnection Perf tests collect various performance metrics while running a loopback connection similar to the webrtc.RTCPeerConnection tests. Like those, multiple variants are identified primarily by a codec name in the test case name and an extra “hw” or “sw” identifier to indicate the encoding and decoding implementation used. Some of the collected metrics are GPU usage, power consumption and average encoding and decoding time.

  • Tests with a multi_..._NxN identifier establish the loopback connection as the rest of the test case identifiers would determine, and then play in parallel as many videos of the specified codec so as to have an NxN grid, scaling the videos as necessary.

MediaRecorder tests (webrtc.MediaRecorder)

MediaRecorderAccelerator verifies that MediaRecorder uses the video hardware encoding accelerator if this is expected from the device capabilities. The test cases are divided by codec similar to the RTC PeerConnection tests.

  • Tests with the cam identifier utilize the internal DUT camera if this is available, verifying that the format produced by it is compatible with the hardware video encoding stack. Tests without this identifier use the fake video capture device.

MediaRecorder is a legacy test that verifies the MediaRecorder JS API functionality.

MediaRecorder Perf tests (webrtc.MediaRecorderPerf)

The MediaRecorder Perf tests collect various performance metrics while running a recording session for a given amount of time. Like other tests in this folder, multiple variants are identified primarily by a codec name in the test case name and an extra “hw” or “sw” identifier to indicate the encoding and decoding implementation used and verified. Some of the collected metrics are, again, GPU usage, power consumption and average encoding and decoding time.

GetDisplayMedia tests (webrtc.GetDisplayMedia)

GetDisplayMedia is the JS API used for screen/window/tab content capture. The test cases here implemented verify that some of these sources, identified by their specification names, can indeed capture content and do not produce black frames.